Although the most serious causes of food poisoning like Salmonella come largely from animal products (for example, most foodborne-related deaths have been attributed to poultry), millions of Americans are sickened by produce every year, thanks to noroviruses. Noroviruses canspread person-to-person via the fecal-oral route or by the ingestion of aerosolized vomit, which together may explain most norovirus food outbreaks. But a substantial proportion remained unexplained. How else can fecal viruses get on our fruits and veggies?

The pesticide industry may be spraying them on (See Video here).

The water that’s used to spray pesticides on crops may be dredged up from ponds contaminated with fecal pathogens. When you hear of people getting infected with a stomach bug like E. coli from something like spinach, it’s important to realize that the pathogen didn’t originate from the spinach. Intestinal bugs come from intestines. Greens don’t have guts; plants don’t poop.

“The application of pesticides may therefore not only be a chemical hazard, but also a microbiological hazard for public health.” What is the industry’s solution? To add more chemicals! “The inclusion of antiviral substances in reconstituted pesticides,” researchers assert, “may be appropriate to reduce the virological health risk posed by the application of pesticides.” Or we could just choose organic.

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Photo by andypowe11

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